green swimming pool photo

A Green Swimming Pool: Causes & Fixes

In Cleaning and Organization by Ryan MartinLeave a Comment

If you have a green swimming pool and you want to know what the heck is going on, look no further. Today we are going to cover just why in the world you pool turned green. We will then give you a couple of tips on how to fix it, as well as how to prevent it from happening again. Enjoy!

Basic Causes

Okay, so the main reason you may have a green swimming pool is due to algae or bacteria buildup. This is usually more prominent in warmer more humid temperatures. It is also more likely to occur if your water is stagnant for too long. What are the actual causes of algae and bacteria buildup? Let’s find out!

Bad pH Levels

We’re sure you’ve heard the term pH, but let’s find out what that actually means. pH stands for “power of hydrogen”, but more importantly it is a scale used to measure how acidic or basic your water is. The scale goes from 0 – 14 with 7 being neutral. If you’d like a visual on pH levels be sure to check out our pH level infographic. pH levels less than 7 are acidic which you DO NOT want. pH levels above 7 are basic. Your optimal pH levels are between 7 and 8. with 7.8 being the most ideal. Regular monitoring of your pH levels and regular cleanings can help you prevent bad pH levels.

Filters

Filters are an easy way to prevent algae and bacteria buildup but it is also easy to let them get out of hand. If you allow your filters to get clogged up for too long, your pool will become a paradise for bacteria and even mold and fungi. Filters are pretty easy to clean. You usually just take them out and rinse them off with water and maybe scrub them down a bit. This would be a good weekly chore to assign one of the kiddos to earn some allowance money.

So that’s all great for causes and preventing a green swimming pool, but how do you fix it if it’s green RIGHT NOW? First, calm down. Second, read on and we’ll tell you!

Shocking!

Sounds cool right? Shocking (also known as shock treatment) is when you put a large amount of chlorine in your pool to try to attack all the bacteria and algae all at once. A standard shock treatment usually involves pouring about 3 gallons of chlorine in the pool. You then wait 24 hours and see if the green went away. You’ll also want to do a regular cleaning the next day and check the pH levels before you let people swim in it again.

Maintenance

Now that you know how to fix a green swimming pool we thought we’d reiterate how important maintenance is. Pool maintenance should be performed once every week. If you are well versed in pool maintenance, it may be a good thing to teach your kids how to do it and make it part of their house chores. If not, the best option is always to have a professional take care of it for you. You always want to keep your pool as safe as possible as well as keeping it looking as sparkly as went it was installed.

Need Maintenance?

Do you need help or expertise when it comes to maintaining your pool? Let us take care of it for you!

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